The vision work presents the possibilities of developing Mellunkylä

MDI and the ‘Uusi Kaupunki collective’ prepared the Mellunkylä vision work for the City of Helsinki. Mellunkylä is one of the city’s so-called urban renewal areas together with Malmi and Malminkartano. Urban renewal areas aim to reduce disparities in well-being, develop a sense of security and ‘cosiness’ and increase vitality and attractiveness.The vision work now prepared is a continuation of the scenario and vision work for the development of Malmi, which was undertaken previously by MDI and the collective. The vision work guides the further planning of the Mellunkylä area.

Mellunkylä consists of the Kontula, Mellunmäki, Vesala, Kurkimäki and Kivikko sub-areas. The district, with about 39 000 inhabitants, would be the 28th largest municipality in Finland in terms of population. The population structure of Mellunkylä is somewhat older than in the rest of Helsinki, lower educated and lower in income and employment. 31% of the area’s population is foreign-speaking, making it one of the most international in the country.

The different areas of Mellunkylä, such as Kontula and Mellunmäki, are profiled in very different ways. One of the aims of the vision work was to develop the area and its image, and to increase the area’s attractiveness as a place to live and do business. In order to avoid segregation, the area should be developed in such a way that it also attracts the middle class. The goal of the urban reform is to create 6 200 new apartments in Mellunkylä by 2035.

In the vision work, the development of the area was examined for four target areas. The Mellunkylä Avenue vision examined the completion of Kontulantie which connects the Kontula and Mellunmäki station areas. The Puu-Kivikko vision, on the other hand, looked at the building completion of Kivikko’s edge and Kontulankaari. Lighter basic vision plans were drawn up for Mellunmäki centre and the Kurkimäki industrial area. The development of each target area and its impacts were analysed in the light of both fast and moderate growth scenarios. In addition, measures were developed in the vision work for different scenarios, as well as thematically for housing, work, transport and leisure.

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